Philosophy

Meta-, in Greek, means “beside”, “beyond”. At Metasus we reach beyond the dialogue on sustainable design and embed it into our philosophy. Metasus Design is a community of designers who share a broad outlook on sustainability. Energy efficiency, social justice, environmental protection, economic development, cultural expression--all these factors are a necessary part of sustainable design. Everything that people make--cities, buildings, tools, works of art--should reflect a holistic perspective about life on earth. Metasus designers place a high value on energy and resource efficiency, durability, adaptability, environmental health, natural diversity, craftsmanship, and cultural significance. Their work is a challenge to consumerism and the myth of limitless economic growth.
Sustainable design is entering its third generation. The first revolution, in the 70's, was driven by new ideas in passive and active solar design and the need to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. The second revolution, still underway, has been driven by improved energy- and performance-modeling technologies to improve the liveability of sustainable buildings, and to reduce our carbon footprint. The third revolution, just beginning, is more holistic. Sustainable design is not just about energy efficiency and the reduction of CO2, although these remain important.
Threats to environmental and social health are more extensive and complex than the problem of increased CO2. We see the consequences in air pollution; erosion and loss of soil fertility; destruction of natural habitat; species endangerment; scarcity of potable water; unrest due to resource competition and growing income inequality; loss of cultural heritage and identity due to generic urbanization; and the increased vulnerability of social structures due to dependence on complex technological systems.
All these threats to societies and the planet are interlinked. Sustainable design should acknowledge all of these issues as we come to realize that a multi-faceted response is likely to be the most effective. Metasus designers think across disciplines and across scales. Both traditional solutions and new technologies are useful, depending on the situation. Sustainable societies respect future generations by making the necessary adjustments to development and consumption patterns in order to pass on a world no less healthy or abundant than the one they have experienced.
Sustainable design helps everything flourish--cultures, communities, individuals, and the planet--without selfishness or a preference to any one society, generation, or species.

Inspiring projects

  • An Apartment by R. Schindler

    In this apartment by Rudolph Schindler, the wood-paneled walls and natural light create a comfortable space that brings us closer to nature. A stool by J.B. Blunk sits in front of the built-in sofa, next to a pair of Frank Lloyd Wright tables.

    A seamless integration with nature is one of Schindler’s values in architecture and can be found in most of his projects across Southern California. 

     

  • Maison de Verre

    Maison de Verre (House of Glass), a live/work house built bewteen 1928 to 1932 in Paris for Dr. Jean Dalsace, is a masterpiece of 20th-century modernist architecture. The design was a collaboration bewteen Pierre Chareau (lead architect and interior designer), Bernard Bijvoet (architect) and Louis Dalbet (metal craftsman). Much of the intricate moving scenery of the house was designed on site as the project developed. The beautiful interior of house is unique for the wonderful uses of various industrial materials and custom mechanical fixtures juxtaposed with traditional home furnishings all illuminated by the dramatic light glowing through the translucent glass-block façade.

  • The Gallery at Sketch

    Celebrated British artist, David Shrigley, has transformed the gallery at Sketch as part of a long-term programme of artist-conceived restaurants. India Mahdavi, who has created a backdrop for David Shrigley’s artwork, conceived a soothing, monochromatic, strikingly comprehensive interior. The classic, almost bourgeois design invites a deliberately playful contrast with the witty, outré art works; all is most certainly not what it seems. While matching sketch’s delight in the avant-garde, this harmonious vibe breaks with the Gallery’s usual eclecticism.

  • The Schaffer House

    This open and relaxed kitchen in the Schaffer house by John Lautner is one of the most beautiful examples of Mid-Century modern house designs, which strive to bring the outdoors inside by using large expanses of glass, integrating with natural landscapes, and emphasizing natural materials.

    Constructed largely of redwood and glass supported by red brick and concrete, the Schaffer House feels like a newly pitched tent or a wood cabin that provides shelter and privacy without boxing out nature.

    Lautner designed the house for the Schaffer family, who originally used the property for picnics under the majestic oak trees and decided they wanted to live there permanently. 

  • Casa Tabarelli

    Hidden in the slopes of the vineyard village of Cornaiano near Bolzano, Italy is Casa Tabarelli, a modernist masterpiece designed in 1968 by Carlo Scarpa and Sergio Los for the Tabarelli family. The spacious interior is dominated by a colorful abstract ceiling that creates rooms with varying ceiling heights. Many of the masterful works within the house combine art and function, such as the entrance gate made from orthogonal metal rods, the steel abstract kinetic sculpture, and the sliding wall with painted geometry and hinged panels. 

  • Belle Epoque Brasserie

    The design of Belle Epoque is a meditation on the industrial era in Continental Europe (1870-1930), a period where tradition met scientific development and handcraft techniques were challenged by industrial processes. Mankind began to explore creative possibilities latent in new methods and materials; the result was a synthesis of artistic sensibility and mechanical power. At this stage, when industrialization showed its potential to dominate and threaten the natural environment, a counteracting dream, art nouveau, began to take hold: the desire to express a world transformed by the organic life force.  

Contact

Warehouse Address:

9/F, 48 Wong Chuk Hang Rd

Hong Kong

+852 2997 9080

info@metasus.net