Inspiring projects

  • Casa Mollino

    Casa Mollino remained a mystery until after the death of the designer in 1973. Only in 1999 did it pass into the hands of Ferrari, who has a similarly diverse background to Mollino, having been a chemist, restaurateur and design dealer. With the help of the meticulous inventory of the property made by Mollino’s lawyers, he was able to recreate the original appearance of the apartment and open it to the public by appointment. While renovating the interiors, Ferrari discovered the cover of a book by Mollino, titled Il Messaggio Dalla Camera Oscura (‘The Message from the Dark Room’), depicting the head of an Egyptian queen. This reference to Egyptian funerary art became the key to decoding a series of symbols, which suggest Mollino’s project was conceived in the manner of a Pharaoh’s pyramid, as an intended final resting place. 

  • Belle Epoque Brasserie

    The design of Belle Epoque is a meditation on the industrial era in Continental Europe (1870-1930), a period where tradition met scientific development and handcraft techniques were challenged by industrial processes. Mankind began to explore creative possibilities latent in new methods and materials; the result was a synthesis of artistic sensibility and mechanical power. At this stage, when industrialization showed its potential to dominate and threaten the natural environment, a counteracting dream, art nouveau, began to take hold: the desire to express a world transformed by the organic life force.  

  • The Schaffer House

    This open and relaxed kitchen in the Schaffer house by John Lautner is one of the most beautiful examples of Mid-Century modern house designs, which strive to bring the outdoors inside by using large expanses of glass, integrating with natural landscapes, and emphasizing natural materials.

    Constructed largely of redwood and glass supported by red brick and concrete, the Schaffer House feels like a newly pitched tent or a wood cabin that provides shelter and privacy without boxing out nature.

    Lautner designed the house for the Schaffer family, who originally used the property for picnics under the majestic oak trees and decided they wanted to live there permanently. 

  • Casa Tabarelli

    Hidden in the slopes of the vineyard village of Cornaiano near Bolzano, Italy is Casa Tabarelli, a modernist masterpiece designed in 1968 by Carlo Scarpa and Sergio Los for the Tabarelli family. The spacious interior is dominated by a colorful abstract ceiling that creates rooms with varying ceiling heights. Many of the masterful works within the house combine art and function, such as the entrance gate made from orthogonal metal rods, the steel abstract kinetic sculpture, and the sliding wall with painted geometry and hinged panels. 

  • Maison de Verre

    Maison de Verre (House of Glass), a live/work house built bewteen 1928 to 1932 in Paris for Dr. Jean Dalsace, is a masterpiece of 20th-century modernist architecture. The design was a collaboration bewteen Pierre Chareau (lead architect and interior designer), Bernard Bijvoet (architect) and Louis Dalbet (metal craftsman). Much of the intricate moving scenery of the house was designed on site as the project developed. The beautiful interior of house is unique for the wonderful uses of various industrial materials and custom mechanical fixtures juxtaposed with traditional home furnishings all illuminated by the dramatic light glowing through the translucent glass-block façade.

  • Studio 9

    Studio 9 is a 4000 SF private multi disciplinary creative studio with state of art facilities that caters to artisanal design and crafts, music performance and production, avant guard fashion and lifestyle, creative photography and branding, food and beverage experimentation…etc. It is located in an elegantly rehabilitated industrial unit in the up-and-coming creative district of Wong Chuk Hang. Studio 9 was founded and designed by Ahlaiya Yung in 2016 as a project experimenting in ways of combining his passion for artisanal design and crafts with his love for truly authentic cultural and creative activities. There should be no boundaries between all creative disciplines. Studio 9 is an attempt to realise this ideal or at least find the knowledge and elements necessary to bring it to realisation.  

     

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