Philosophy

Meta-, in Greek, means “beside”, “beyond”. At Metasus we reach beyond the dialogue on sustainable design and embed it into our philosophy. Metasus Design is a community of designers who share a broad outlook on sustainability. Energy efficiency, social justice, environmental protection, economic development, cultural expression--all these factors are a necessary part of sustainable design. Everything that people make--cities, buildings, tools, works of art--should reflect a holistic perspective about life on earth. Metasus designers place a high value on energy and resource efficiency, durability, adaptability, environmental health, natural diversity, craftsmanship, and cultural significance. Their work is a challenge to consumerism and the myth of limitless economic growth.
Sustainable design is entering its third generation. The first revolution, in the 70's, was driven by new ideas in passive and active solar design and the need to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. The second revolution, still underway, has been driven by improved energy- and performance-modeling technologies to improve the liveability of sustainable buildings, and to reduce our carbon footprint. The third revolution, just beginning, is more holistic. Sustainable design is not just about energy efficiency and the reduction of CO2, although these remain important.
Threats to environmental and social health are more extensive and complex than the problem of increased CO2. We see the consequences in air pollution; erosion and loss of soil fertility; destruction of natural habitat; species endangerment; scarcity of potable water; unrest due to resource competition and growing income inequality; loss of cultural heritage and identity due to generic urbanization; and the increased vulnerability of social structures due to dependence on complex technological systems.
All these threats to societies and the planet are interlinked. Sustainable design should acknowledge all of these issues as we come to realize that a multi-faceted response is likely to be the most effective. Metasus designers think across disciplines and across scales. Both traditional solutions and new technologies are useful, depending on the situation. Sustainable societies respect future generations by making the necessary adjustments to development and consumption patterns in order to pass on a world no less healthy or abundant than the one they have experienced.
Sustainable design helps everything flourish--cultures, communities, individuals, and the planet--without selfishness or a preference to any one society, generation, or species.

Inspiring projects

  • Studio 9

    Studio 9 is a 4000 SF private multi disciplinary creative studio with state of art facilities that caters to artisanal design and crafts, professional music performance and production, avant guard fashion and lifestyle, creative photography and branding, food and beverage experimentation…etc. It is located in an elegantly rehabilitated industrial unit in the up-and-coming creative district of Wong Chuk Hang. Studio 9 was founded and designed by Ahlaiya Yung in 2016 as a project experimenting in ways of combining his passion for artisanal design and crafts with his love for truly authentic cultural and creative activities. There should be no boundaries between all creative disciplines. Studio 9 is an attempt to realise this ideal or at least find the knowledge and elements necessary to bring it to realisation.  

     

  • The Schaffer House

    This open and relaxed kitchen in the Schaffer house by John Lautner is one of the most beautiful examples of Mid-Century modern house designs, which strive to bring the outdoors inside by using large expanses of glass, integrating with natural landscapes, and emphasizing natural materials.

    Constructed largely of redwood and glass supported by red brick and concrete, the Schaffer House feels like a newly pitched tent or a wood cabin that provides shelter and privacy without boxing out nature.

    Lautner designed the house for the Schaffer family, who originally used the property for picnics under the majestic oak trees and decided they wanted to live there permanently. 

  • Belle Epoque Brasserie

    The design of Belle Epoque is a meditation on the industrial era in Continental Europe (1870-1930), a period where tradition met scientific development and handcraft techniques were challenged by industrial processes. Mankind began to explore creative possibilities latent in new methods and materials; the result was a synthesis of artistic sensibility and mechanical power. At this stage, when industrialization showed its potential to dominate and threaten the natural environment, a counteracting dream, art nouveau, began to take hold: the desire to express a world transformed by the organic life force.  

  • Salon 10

    Salon No.10 is a private member’s salon—a gathering place for the city’s creative professionals, connoisseurs, international entrepreneurs and discerning travelers. set within the clamor of Central Hong Kong. Passing through the massive, hatch-like front door, one feels as if one has entered another space and time. The noise and traffic of Arbuthnot Road, visible through the window, seems distant and unreal, as if one has dropped twenty fathoms under the sea on a timeless subterranean journey to a far away place. 

  • An Apartment by R. Schindler

    In this apartment by Rudolph Schindler, the wood-paneled walls and natural light create a comfortable space that brings us closer to nature. A stool by J.B. Blunk sits in front of the built-in sofa, next to a pair of Frank Lloyd Wright tables.

    A seamless integration with nature is one of Schindler’s values in architecture and can be found in most of his projects across Southern California. 

     

  • The Second Goetheanum

    Rudolf Steiner’s second Goetheanum, completed in 1928, is situated in the mountainous region of Dornach, Switzerland, Steiner’s first Goetheanum was completed in 1919 and comprised primarily of sculpted wood. but after only a few years, it burned down by arson. Steiner designed the second Goetheanum as an illustration of ‘a new style of architecture. it represents a pioneering use of visible concrete in architecture, particularly in its achievement of sculptural shapes on an architectural scale. 

Contact

Warehouse Address:

9/F, 48 Wong Chuk Hang Rd

Hong Kong

+852 2997 9080

info@metasus.net